Tichina Arnold dating

Tuesday, July 5, 2011. Actress Tichina Arnold ('Everybody Hates Chris') came flying out of the closet this weekend when she posted pics of herself and her cutie pie lover on her Facebook page.Wait, you didn't know Tichina was a lesbian? I thought I told you that she lived with rapper MC Lyte for at least 5 years in Atlanta in the 90s? Tichina Arnold has a daughter from her previous relationship with the music producer and songwriter Carvin Haggins, her name is Alijah Kai Haggins, and she was born in 2004. Personal Life Tichina Arnold had a relationship with the musical artist Norwood Young, and with the rap singer and record producer David Banner, both relationships were ... Tichina Arnold is one of the most loved American female comedians of all time. She recently said goodbye to her character Cassie Calloway form the popular comedy television series Survivor's Remorse as the show aired it's last episode on October 10, 2017, and we are already missing her.. So, what is she doing these days? Is the diva who has been divorced twice dating someone? Tichina Arnold’s Boyfriend. Tichina Arnold is single. She is not dating anyone currently. Tichina had at least 5 relationship in the past. Tichina Arnold has not been previously engaged. She had a daughter named Alijah Kai Haggins with music producer Carvin Haggins. She later married basketball assistant coach DaRico Hines. Tichina Rolanda Arnold (; born June 28, 1969) is an American actress, comedian, and singer. She began her career as a child actor, appearing in supporting roles in Little Shop of Horrors (1986) and How I Got into College (1989) before being cast as Pamela 'Pam' James on the FOX sitcom Martin, which she played from 1992 until the show ended in 1997. Tichina Arnold. Posted on November 28, 2017 October 17, 2020 by. ... LAST season Pam and Tommy eased back on their involvement and started dating other The real-life Kane later became a senior editor of Sports Illustrated magazine and. Happy anniversary to the Halperts! Considering how much The Office still seems to be in our everyday life ... On 28-6-1969 Tichina Arnold was born in New York City, New York. She made her 12.5 million dollar fortune with Martin, Survivor's Remorse & Daytime Divas. The actress & musician is currently single, her starsign is Cancer and she is now 51 years of age. Tichina Arnold's former husband, Rico Hines, who filmed himself cheating on her, has become a member of the coaching staff for the Sacramento Kings. In July 2019, the Sacramento Kings added three new members to the coaching staff of the basketball team. Hines shared a video later in the year in which he was coaching his players. Who is Tichina Arnold dating? Tichina Arnold is currently single, according to our records.. The American TV Actress was born in Queens, NY on June 28, 1969. Portrayed Pamela James on FOX’s sitcom Martin as well as Chris’s headstrong, assertive mother on Everybody Hates Chris. Tichina Arnold's split from her husband (Rico Hines) made major headlines in early 2016 after she exposed him for cheating and a sex tape leaked. Now, it looks like Tichina is happier than ever ...

2019 is looking to be a really, really exciting year for film. I’ve compiled a comprehensive list of 50+ upcoming original/adapted films that are showing real promise, and 25+ major franchise/sequel films. Includes summaries, links, and details. Enjoy!

2019.01.30 15:52 santaschesthairs 2019 is looking to be a really, really exciting year for film. I’ve compiled a comprehensive list of 50+ upcoming original/adapted films that are showing real promise, and 25+ major franchise/sequel films. Includes summaries, links, and details. Enjoy!

TL;DR: this year is insane.

Let me dive right in - hopefully I hit the 300 character minimum.

Original/adapted/stand-alone films:


Midsommar
A horror film from break-out director Ari Aster (Hereditary).
A young couple travels to Sweden to visit their friend’s rural hometown and attend its mid-summer festival. What begins as an idyllic retreat quickly descends into a bizarre and violent competition at the hands of a pagan cult.
Directed by Ari Aster. Starring Florence Pugh, Jack Reynor, Will Poulter and William Jackson Harper.

Ad Astra
A sci-fi film with Brad Pitt - I’m itching for a trailer.
Army Corps engineer Roy McBride embarks on a mission across the galaxy to discover the truth about his father, who disappeared in space 20 years ago while searching for signs of alien life.
Directed by James Gray. Starring Brad Pitt, Tommy Lee Jones and Ruth Negga.

Knives Out
Rian Johnson is a touch controversial after The Last Jedi, but he's undeniably very talented. He directed the best Breaking Bad episode after all.
Modern-day murder mystery in the classic Agatha Christie whodunit style.
Directed by Rian Johnson (The Last Jedi, Ozymandias). Starring Daniel Craig, Lakeith Stanfield, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Christopher Plummer, Ana de Armas, Jamie Lee Curtis and Toni Collette.

The Irishman
A Scorsese film with Netflix that’s gone seriously over-budget, bound to be enjoyable.
A mob hit man recalls his possible involvement with the slaying of Jimmy Hoffa.
Starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel, Joe Pesci and Ray Romano.

Little Women
A Greta Gertwig film with an outstanding cast. I’m excited. I also have a feeling this will have some play in the 2019 Oscars
Four sisters come of age in America in the aftermath of the Civil War.
Directed by Greta Gertwig. Starring Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Eliza Scanlen, Florence Pugh, Laura Dern, Meryl Streep, Timothée Chalamet, James Norton, Louis Garrel and Bob Odenkirk.

Velvet Buzzsaw
You’ve probably already seen the trailer. An art-world horror-satire from Dan Gilroy, on Netflix in Feb.
Big money artists and mega-collectors pay a high price when art collides with commerce. After a series of paintings by an unknown artist are discovered, a supernatural force enacts revenge on those who have allowed their greed to get in the way of art.
Directed by Dan Gilroy. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo and Toni Collette.

Uncut Gems
Adam Sandler taking on a serious role by the directors of Good Time (2017). If it has any of the same intensity or grit as Good Time this could be awesome.
Set in the diamond district of New York City, Howard Ratner, a jewelry store owner and dealer to the rich and famous, must find a way to pay his debts when his merchandise is taken from one of his top sellers and girlfriend.
Directed by the Safdie brothers. Starring Adam Sandler, Idina Menzel, Lakeith Stanfield and The Weeknd.

The Report
This got pretty great reviews at Sundance, I’m excited.
The story of Daniel Jones, lead investigator for the US Senate’s sweeping study into the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program, which was found to be brutal, immoral and ineffective. With the truth at stake, Jones battled tirelessly to make public what many in power sought to keep hidden.
Directed by Scott Z. Burns. Starring Adam Driver, Annette Bening, Jon Hamm and Jennifer Morrison.

Ford v. Ferrari
Awesome cast, great story, and directed by the guy behind Logan.
Follows an eccentric, determined team of American engineers and designers, led by automotive visionary Carroll Shelby and his British driver, Ken Miles, who are dispatched by Henry Ford II with the mission of building from scratch an entirely new automobile with the potential to finally defeat the perennially dominant Ferrari at the 1966 Le Mans World Championship.
Directed by James Mangold. Starring Christian Bale, Matt Damon, Jon Bernthal and Tracy Letts.

Late Night
This got some pretty great reviews at Sundance.
Legendary late-night talk show host’s world is turned upside down when she hires her only female staff writer. Originally intended to smooth over diversity concerns, her decision has unexpectedly hilarious consequences as the two women separated by culture and generation are united by their love of a biting punchline.
Directed by Nisha Ganatra. Starring Emma Thompson Mindy Kaling.

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Holy shit.
A faded TV actor and his stunt double embark on an odyssey to make a name for themselves in the film industry during the Helter Skelter reign of terror in 1969 Los Angeles.
Directed by Quentin Tarantino. Cast includes Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie, Al Pacino, Timothy Olyphant, Tim Roth, Kurt Russell, Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern, Dakota Fanning,James Marsden, Damian Lewis, Luke Perry, Emile Hirsch, Damon Herriman and Scoot McNairy.
jesus christ i cannot wait

Us
If this is as spoopy as the trailer uh oh.
Husband and wife Gabe and Adelaide Wilson take their kids to their beach house expecting to unplug and unwind with friends. But as night descends, their serenity turns to tension and chaos when some shocking visitors arrive uninvited.
Directed by Jordan Peele. Starring Lupita Nyong'o, Winston Duke, Elisabeth Moss and Tim Heidecker.

The Lighthouse
Next film from the guy behind the VVitch
The story of an aging lighthouse keeper named Old who lives in early 20th-century Maine.
Directed by Robert Eggers. Starring Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson.

High Life
Really good reviews, sci-fi that looks like it could be pretty trippy.
A father and his daughter struggle to survive in deep space where they live in isolation.
Directed by Claire Denis. Starring Robert Pattinson.

Radegund
A Terrence Mallick movie, so it's going to be divisive, but the plot does have potential.
Told through real wartime letters, this love story finds a couple in conflict with the members of their close-knit town, their church, their government, and even their friends — all of which brings them to a dramatic choice.
Directed by Terrence Mallick. Starring August Deihl and Valerie Pachner.

Luce
I know every movie is called a sign of the times, but this one seems particularly geared towards the current politics. Really good Sundance reviews.
A star athlete and top student, Luce’s idealized image is challenged by one of his teachers when his unsettling views on political violence come to light, putting a strain on family bonds while igniting intense debates on race and identity.
Directed by Julius Onah. Starring Kelvin Harrison Jr., Naomi Watts, Tim Roth and Octavia Spencer.

The Souvenir
This one just got rave reviews at Sundance.
A quiet film student begins finding her voice as an artist while navigating a turbulent courtship with a charismatic but untrustworthy man.
Directed by Joanna Hogg. Starring Honor Swinton-Byrne, Tom Burke, Tilda Swinton and Richard Ayoade.

Untitled Noah Baumbach Project
This one is obviously a bit unknown. But the cast looks amazing, and if it turns out as good as The Meyerowitz Stories, I can't wait to watch. Will be a Netflix film.
Directed by Noah Baumbach. Starring Adam Driver, Scarlett Johannsen, Laura Dern and Greta Gertwig.

Honey Boy
Great reviews from Sundance, 100% on RT as of now.
The story of a child star attempting to mend his relationship with his law-breaking, alcohol-abusing father over the course of a decade, loosely based on Shia LaBeouf’s life.
Directed by Alma Har’el. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Lucas Hedges and yada yada.

Queen & Slim
Very interesting premise, and Daniel Kaluuya.
The film centers on a black man and black woman who go on a first date that goes awry after the two are pulled over by a police officer at a traffic stop. They kill the police officer in self-defense and rather than turn themselves in, they go on the run.
Directed by Melina Matsoukas. Starring Daniel Kaluuya and Jodie Turner-Smith.

The Farewell
Another film with good reviews out of Sundance.
A headstrong Chinese-American woman returns to China when her beloved grandmother is given a terminal diagnosis. Billi struggles with her family’s decision to keep grandma in the dark about her own illness as they all stage an impromptu wedding to see grandma one last time.
Directed by Lulu Wang. Starring Awkwafina.

Long Shot
A comedy with a cool cast by Jonathan Levine.
A political journalist tries to hook up with his old babysitter, who now holds an important government position.
Directed by Jonathan Levine. Starring Seth Rogen, Charlize Theron and Alexander Skarsgård.

Rocketman
I was disappointed with Bohemian last year, so I'm reminding myself to be sceptical, but I hope this is excellent. Trailer here.
The story of Elton John's life, from his years as a prodigy at the Royal Academy of Music through his influential and enduring musical partnership with Bernie Taupin.
Directed by Dexter Fletcher. Starring Taron Egerton (as Elton), Jamie Bell, Richard Madden and Bryce Dallas Howard.

The Goldfinch
Based on the bestselling book. Director of Brooklyn.
A boy in New York is taken in by a wealthy family after his mother is killed in a bombing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In a rush of panic, he steals ‘The Goldfinch’, a painting that eventually draws him into a world of crime.
Directed by John Crowley. Cast includes Ansel Elgort, Finn Wolfhard, Aneurin Barnard, Oakes Fegley, Ashleigh Cummings, Willa Fitzgerald and Nicole Kidman.

Big Time Adolescence
It's a little too early to tell from the Sundance reviews, but I really hope this is good. Pete Davidson and the guy who plays Sam in American Vandal star.
A 16 year old virgin with a growth hormone deficiency slowly gets corrupted by his hero, an aimless college dropout.
Directed by Jason Orley. Starring Pete Davidson and Griffin Gluck.

Triple Frontier
The cast for this Netflix action thriller is awesome. If the trailer and director is anything to go by though, this looks really promising.
Struggling to make ends meet, former special ops soldiers reunite for a high-stakes heist: stealing $75 million from a South American drug lord.
Directed by J.C. Chandor (Margin Call). Starring Ben Affleck, Oscar Isaac, Charlie Hunnam and Pedro Pascal.

Chaos Walking
I hope this is amazing, but the premise sounds incredibly difficult to pull off. Good cast and director, so fingers crossed. I'm using the book description here.
A dystopian world where all living creatures can hear each other's thoughts in a stream of images, words, and sounds called Noise.
Directed by Doug Liman (Edge of Tomorrow). Starring Tom Holland and Daisy Ridley.

The Rosie Project
Few details are out. Ryan Reynolds, based on a good book.
An unlucky-in-love university professor creates an elaborate questionnaire in an effort to find a wife and meets an unconventional woman who doesn’t match any of his “requirements”, but might be the perfect woman for him.
Directed by Ben Taylor. Starring Ryan Reynolds.

The Beach Bum
The trailer looks completely wack. Make sure you watch it:
An irreverent comedy about the misadventures of Moondog, a rebellious stoner and lovable rogue who lives large.
Directed by Harmony Korine (Spring Breakers). Starring Matthew McConaughey, Snoop Dogg, Zac Efron and Isla Fisher.

Parasite
I don't know much about this one, but the director previously made Snowpiercer, Okja and my favourite, Memories of Murder. I'm excited.
All unemployed, Ki-taek’s family takes peculiar interest in the Parks for their livelihood until they get entangled in an expected incident.
Directed by Bong Joon-Ho. Starring Song Kang-ho, Lee Sun-kyun, Jo Yeo-jeong and Choi Woo-shik.

I Am Mother
This one comes from nowhere. An indie sci-fi with with an interesting plot, and good Sundance reviews.
A teenage girl is raised underground by a robot “Mother”, designed to repopulate the earth following an extinction event. But their unique bond is threatened when an inexplicable stranger arrives with alarming news.0
Directed by Grant Sputore. Starring Hillary Swank , Clara Rugaard-Larsen and Rose Byrne.

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile
You’ve more than likely heard of this one. Ted Bundy film starring Zac Efron. I’m not sure how excited I am for the film, but Efron’s performance is apparently very good.
A chronicle of the crimes of Ted Bundy, from the perspective of his longtime girlfriend, Elizabeth Kloepfer, who refused to believe the truth about him for years.
Directed by Joe Berlinger. Starring Lily Collins, Zac Efron and John Malkovich.

The Nightingale
The second film from the director of the Babadook. Really promising (and slightly divisive) reviews out of Sundance. Fun fact: you can kinda measure the divisiveness of a film on RT by comparing the percentage meter with the average rating. If the percentage is high but the average rating is low, it shows that the film is all-round solid and inoffensive. If the percentage rating is lower but the average rating is still high/moderate, it means there’s a large gap between those who loved and didn’t like it. Anyway, back to the Nightingale. I’m excited - doubly so since it’s an Aussie film.
In 1829, Claire, a 21-year-old Irish convict, chases a British soldier through the rugged Tasmanian wilderness, bent on revenge for a terrible act of violence he committed against her family. She enlists the services of an Aboriginal tracker named Billy, who is also marked by trauma from his own violence-filled past.
Directed by Jennifer Kent. Starring Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin, Damon Herriman and Ewen Leslie.

The Dead Don't Die
Another awesome cast, definitely one to look forward to. The plot summary isn’t out, but it’s a comedy zombie flick.
Directed by Jim Jarmusch. Starring Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Selena Gomez, Chloë Sevigny, Austin Butler, Steve Buscemi and Tilda Swinton.

Memoria
Tilda Swinton seems to be working a lot, woah.
Memoria revolves around a character (portrayed by Tilda Swinton) who suffers from exploding head syndrome, a psychological condition in which a person experiences loud noises when falling asleep or waking up.
Directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Starring Tilda Swinton and Jeanne Balibar.

Where'd You Go, Bernadette
The trailer for this, particularly the music, wasn’t good. The content of the trailer shows a lot of potential though, and the book is apparently really good. Also: Richard Linklater.
When architect-turned-recluse Bernadette Fox goes missing prior to a family trip to Antarctica, her 15-year-old daughter Bee goes on a quest with Bernadette’s husband to find her.
Directed by Richard Linklater. Starring Cate Blanchett ,Emma Nelson, Billy Crudup, Kristen Wiig, Judy Greer and Laurence Fishburne.

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Tom Hanks seems made for this role. Should be good.
The story of Fred Rogers, the honored host and creator of the popular children’s television program, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood (1968).
Directed by Marielle Heller. Starring Tom Hanks, Matthew Rhys and Chris Cooper.

High Flying Bird
I’ll make this quick: Excellent reviews so far. Netflix in Feb. Steven Soderbergh. Shot on an iPhone. Moonlight writer.
During an NBA lockout, a sports agent, Dean, presents his rookie client, Erick Scott, with an intriguing and controversial business opportunity.
Directed by Steven Soderbergh (Ocean’s 11). Starring André Holland Zazie Beetz Jeryl Prescott Kyle MacLachlan Caleb McLaughlin Zachary Quinto.

The Cradle
I don’t know much about this one but the plot intrigues me. For some reason it reminds me of Denis Villeneuve's early film, Incendies (if you haven’t watched yet, make it your next film - it’s incredible.)
A young couple not ready to expect their first baby track down a cradle, only to make a discovery that will change their family forever.
Directed by Hope Dickson Leach. Starring Jack O'Connell and Lily Collins.

The Woman in the Window
A Rear Window-esque movie with a great cast and director. Really hoping this is great, cos I love these kind of plots.
An agoraphobic woman living alone in New York begins spying on her new neighbors only to witness a disturbing act of violence.
Directed by Joe Wright. Starring Amy Adams, Gary Oldman, Julianne Moore and Wyatt Russell.

Gemini Man
The plot is crazy, but the cast and director can definitely pull it off.
Henry Brogen, an aging assassin tries to get out of the business but finds himself in the ultimate battle: fighting his own clone who is 25 years younger than him and at the peak of his abilities.
Directed by Ang Lee. Starring Will Smith, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Clive Owen and Benedict Wong.

The Last Black Man in San Francisco
Yet another film with great reviews from Sundance.
Jimmie Fails dreams of reclaiming the Victorian home his grandfather built in the heart of San Francisco. Joined on his quest by his best friend Mont, Jimmie searches for belonging in a rapidly changing city that seems to have left them behind.
Directed by Joe Talbot. Starring Jimmie Fails, Jonathan Majors, Rob Morgan and Tichina Arnold.

Blinded by the Light
Sundance musta been real great this year, cos once again we have another movie with good reviews out of it. Apparently wholesome and inspiring.
In 1987, during the austere days of Thatcher’s Britain, a teenager learns to live life, understand his family, and find his own voice through the music of Bruce Springsteen.
Directed by Gurinder Chadha. Starring Viveik Kalra, Nell William and Hayley Atwell.

Before You Know It
Good reviews. Sundance. Family comedy.
A long-kept family secret thrusts codependent, thirty-something sisters Rachel and Jackie Gurner into a literal soap opera. A journey that proves that you really can come of age, at any age.
Directed by Hannah Pearl Utt. Starring Hannah Pearl Utt, Jen Tullock and Judith Light.

Little Monsters
SUNDANCE. GOOD. ZOMBIES. COMEDY.
A washed-up musician teams up with a teacher and a kids show personality to protect young children from a sudden outbreak of zombies.
Directed by Abe Forsythe. Starring Lupita Nyong'o, Josh Gad, Alexander England and Nadia Townsend.

Jojo Rabbit
I'll watch anything Taika makes, but this looks insane - one of my most hyped. (I accidentally deleted this from the list while editing!!)
Jojo Rabbit is about a young boy living during World War II. His only escapism is through his imaginary friend, an ethnically inaccurate version of Adolf Hitler, who pushes the young boy’s naive patriotic beliefs. However, this all changes when a young girl challenges those views and causes Jojo to face his own issues.
Directed by Taiki Watiti. Starring Taiki Watiti (as Adolf Hitler), Roman Griffin Davis, Thomasin McKenzie, Scarlett Johansson, Sam Rockwell, Rebel Wilson and Alfie Allen.

The Lodge
A spoopy film that was well received at Sundance.
Two siblings spend the night alone with their new stepmother. Stuck in a remote mountain cabin, the trio are terrorised by a supernatural force.
Directed by Veronika Franz, Severin Fiala. Starring Riley Keough, Jaeden Lieberher and Lia McHugh.

1917
World War I film. Plot unknown.
Directed by Sam Mendes. Cinematography by Roger Deakins.

Dragged Across Concrete
Two policemen, one an old-timer, the other his volatile younger partner, find themselves suspended when a video of their strong-arm tactics becomes the media’s cause du jour. Low on cash and with no other options, these two embittered soldiers descend into the criminal underworld to gain their just due, but instead find far more than they wanted awaiting them in the shadows.
Directed by S. Craig Zahler. Starring Mel Gibson, Vince Vaughn, Don Johnson and Jennifer Carpenter.

I’m Thinking of Ending Things
A Charlie Kaufman film, set for Netflix.
An unexpected detour causes a woman who is trying to figure out how to break up with her boyfriend to rethink her life.
Directed by Charlie Kaufman. Starring Brie Larson and Jesse Plemons.

My thoughts

Feel free to ignore lol
After finally managing to finish this compilation, reading plots and wikis and watching trailers, I cannot believe how many good films there are coming out. This is reminding me of 2017, when I made a similar post - and 2017 was an absolutely amazing year overall, especially in light of the relative disappointment of 2018. There’s just so much promise in every category - horror, thriller, biopics, drama, action, comedy… and if you count zombie films as a genre unto themselves, then yeah, that too.
Of course, I cannot wait for Tarantino’s flick. But after that it’s hard to pick ordered favourites - Knives Out, The Dead Don’t Die, Us, The Report and Luce are films I cannot wait for, but there are so many others I’m pumped for - and I haven’t even gone into the blockbusters.

Speaking of…
For the franchise and sequel films, I haven’t gone to the effort of adding plot and cast details. They’re huge, you’ll hear all about them anyway.

Franchise/Sequel/Remake films

Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Star Wars: Episode IX
Zombieland 2: Double Tap
Pokémon: Detective Pikachu
The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part
Avengers: Endgame
Captain Marvel
Joker
Toy Story 4
Shazam!
It: Chapter Two
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Lion King
Dumbo
Aladdin
The New Mutants
Alita: Battle Angel
Hellboy
Dark Phoenix
Men in Black International
Fast & Furious presents: Hobbs & Shaw
Artemis Fowl
Charlie’s Angels
Kingsman 3
Sonic the Hedgehog
Frozen 2

I’m genuinely delirious. I told myself I would get this post done before I went to sleep and I am now totally exhausted. There were far more movies than I anticipated. This year is ridiculous and it has been mean to me. Of course, if I missed anything let me know and I’ll add it once I’ve woken up!
Oh, and if you want to follow me on Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/xaviertobin/
Hope you enjoy! :)
submitted by santaschesthairs to movies [link] [comments]


2018.02.05 18:56 Burntholesinmyhoodie Album of the year review (written by myself): JAY Z's 4:44

Artist: JAY Z
Album: 4:44
Listen:
Apple Music
TIDAL
Background
Throughout all of Jay Z’s past albums, we've come to understand and love this character known for his drug dealing, no-strings-attached sex, and excessive wealth (Jay built his Roc-A-Fella dynasty, became CEO of Def Jam Recordings, and achieved so much more due to his ability to hustle). This character being Jay Z, Hov, Jigga, but not Shawn Carter. Although there have certainly been instances of him being personal in the past (selling drugs to his mother, shooting his brother, feeling responsible for his nephews death, and so on), the large majority of his music has been braggadocio. Magna Carta Holy Grail, his previous album (from 2013), spent almost an hour telling us about his love for riches. Whether that be his collection of Basquiat paintings, designer clothes, or liquor preferences, by the end… well we got the point. Although it did touch on serious topics here and there, it was far from what a 40 year old father would sound fitting discussing. The party-friendly, trap-influenced, attempt at mainstream pandering was about as interesting as watching paint dry. And not even a Basquiat at that.
Now fast forward to 2017. In the time span between 2013 and now, Solange (his sister-in-law), was caught hitting him in an elevator. Then his once close friend, Kanye West, ranted against him. And finally, his wife, Beyonce, made an entire album about him supposedly cheating on her. With controversy at a high surrounding Jay’s respectability, everyone was hungry to hear what he had to say. Curiosity began peaking when billboards and sign began appearing with nothing more that the the numbers “4:44”. It wasn’t much longer until more went up with a date (6.30.17) and a name, JAY Z. No one knew what to expect from a 2017 Jay album, but it’s safe to say he surpassed any and all that prefaced him.
Review
10 seconds into the appropriately titled first track, “Kill Jay Z”, we’re faced with these lines:
Kill Jay Z, they'll never love you
You'll never be enough, let's just keep it real, Jay Z
Fuck Jay Z, I mean, you shot your own brother
First thing off the bat, Jay is dismembering his persona and taking a more self-aware approach. Eric Carter did survive the bullet, and Jay was only a child when this instance took place, but we can see his past mistakes still haunts him to this day. It appears as though he’s still learning how to live with his regrets. What makes “Kill Jay Z” so transparent is that in the process of examining his mistakes and how needs to change, he attacks the ego that has helped him to achieve so much. It’s only fitting he opens up so much on the opening track. Soon after these lines he goes onto discuss how he must change for his children, his tears, pain, regret, and how the mentality he once needed for hustling is no longer necessary. He touches on his relationship with longtime friend and collaborator, Kanye West, and ultimately we can see they’re not in a good place. He ends the song on a few lines referencing how he ‘almost went Eric Benét’, Eric had continually cheated on Halle Berry, giving us a quick glimpse at a very prevalent regret Jay currently has that we will learn most about on the album's title track. Jay’s reflective lyrics flow incredibly well over the soulful (yet modern) No ID production. No ID handles all the production on the album, and each beat is fantastic and perfect for Jay’s crafting. His drums, sample flips, everything, No ID is a legend and absolutely kills it.
A smooth mix of piano and vocal sample (of the legendary Nina Simone) begin “The Story of O.J.”, before Jay comes in discussing the labels that have been attributed to black people in various places of society. The simply worded hook has so much to offer. It shows that people want to separate themselves from molds, but that despite this, due to experiences related to skin colour, there continues to be a common thread and underlying sense of unity. Jay takes 2 perspectives in order to urge people not to abandon recognition of their race, as being aware will help to bring change moreso. This negative viewpoint of his can be seen in this line (most importantly his reaction, listen to how he says it):
O.J. like, "I'm not black, I'm O.J." …okay
The first verse has Jay speaking to what could represent his younger south and many black youth today. He encourages drug dealers to stop before it’s too late and invest their earnings in wise and legitimate ways. The 2nd (and final) verse continues to further discuss how Jay has spent money wisely and also where he wishes he had. Ultimately, Jay wants to help those less-advantaged black youth to become successful like he has, and to live a full life. The goal is to paint himself as a healthy role model but also one that can admit his mistakes, to promote the best choices he can. And for such a race related song, the Simone sample is perfect. “The Story of O.J.” is a great song to show Jay’s growth in maturity, and the beat is especially fitting to this growth.
Jay’s first lines on “Smile” are continuing from where “The Story of O.J.” left off, further discussing his rags to riches and wealth. But it’s right after these first few lines Jay discusses a more personal insight towards his life, with these lines:
Mama had four kids, but she's a lesbian
Had to pretend so long that she's a thespian
Had to hide in the closet, so she medicate
Society shame and the pain was too much to take
Cried tears of joy when you fell in love
Jay is going beyond talking about the challenges gays face and allowing us to see how they have impacted his mother. Society would’ve condemned her for being attracted to the same sex. So, she tried for many years to change and act as if she were straight. This moment serves as another great example of Jay’s personal growth, as he used to use homophobic insults in songs such as “Takeover” and “N- What, N- Who (Originator 99)”. Jay goes on to discuss being loyal, his wealth, overcoming obstacles, Funkmaster Flex, and uses his pen-free abilities to craft great wordplay that Hov is known for. He’s showing happiness for his success, for his mom, and for life, which is only right for a song titled “Smile”. ID did a great job with the catchy Stevie Wonder flip and the song ends with a beautiful poem from Gloria, Jay’s mother. She spreads a positive message that encourages people to be happy with who they are, which is very appropriate based on all she had gone through. I believe it’s the 2nd time she has appeared on a Jay album (first being on The Black Album), and is a great way to close a great song.
“Caught In Their Eyes” has a more happy beat backing Jay. He uses his first verse to describe his struggles growing up and paints a portrait of those who oppose him. All while using some great wordplay. For instance:
I seen eyes wide as they're about to shoot
You can be a hairpin off and you can trigger your roots
On the surface level he’s describing the ways people lived and how they acted, and beyond that is another entendre about Questlove and the legendary Roots. Another line I really like is:
Y'all body language is all remedial
How could you see the difference between you and I?
The first meaning being the literal, that you can’t fathom how many leagues Hov is above you. But also it sounds like the literal letters ‘U’ and ‘I’. Then on top of that, the previous line ended on ‘remedial’, so you expect him to end the following line in the same scheme. This is no mistake, as ‘me and you’ could work easily in ‘you and I’’s place. His change of lyrics makes the words stand out more and is proper English, which could be a play on ‘language’ in ‘body language’. The whole first verse also has a theme of the human body throughout it, body language, hair, his cheek, and at least 3 references to eyes. It’s a short but very interesting and dense verse. Following it, Frank Ocean lends a small and curious hook, touching on the topic of Solipsism and determining what’s real. He claims he’s ready for Earth. Now I’m not certain of what the exact meaning of the hook is and I don’t want to take too big of stretches, but it’s possible it’s too show that the speaker of the song is more real (in a sense of loyalty and principles) than everyone. So much so that he feels as though everything else is literally fiction. Jay uses the 2nd verse to discuss how Londell McMillan (whom he names specifically) screwed over both Jay and Prince’s wished in regards to Prince’s music on streaming services. Despite Prince giving TIDAL (and only TIDAL) permission to use his music, McMillan sued Jay after Prince died in order to gain full control of Prince’s music. He describes the greed that exists in the record industry and ends the verse continuing on the theme of those who oppose him, referencing his ending friendship with Kanye. All of this sounds great over the groovy Nina Simone-sampled beat. I also really like the voice effects on Frank and Jay, it gives a really interesting texture to the song that makes the incredibly smooth beginning of the next track contrast beautifully.
“4:44”, the title track to the album, is in my opinion the most important song to the album. Honestly, I hesitated doing a review on this album because doing this song justice is no easy task. It’s grown to be one of my favourite Jay tracks and my song of the year. But nonetheless I will try!
Do I find it so hard
When I know in my heart
I'm letting you down every day
Letting you down every day
Why do I keep on running away?
No ID opens the song with an incredibly introspective piece of foreshadowing. From this 24 second intro, a red carpet is rolled out for Jay to give us opening lines that speak to us. And he does so with:
Look, I apologize, often womanize
Took for my child to be born, see through a woman's eyes
After years of tracks like Big Pimpin, Girls Girls Girls, Ain’t No N-, On To The Next One, 2 Many Hoes… well you get the idea, he opens up this track with lines that directly oppose and regret such a mindset (and lifestyle). 2017 is the year we saw Jay Z the feminist (at least on this song), and I for one love the growth. Jay not only regrets womanizing, but regrets how he treated his wife Beyonce (asking her not to embarrass him, for instance). He mentions begs Beyonce to pick up the phone and the vocal effect on his voice almost reminds me of a phone call, not sure if that was an intentional connection or not (but it certainly enhances my enjoyment regardless). He goes on to describe Beyonce maturing faster than him, dealing with multiple stillborns (when Jay performed this song live on SNL he actually didn’t say ‘stillborn’ because of the pain), treating her poorly in public, his terrible attempts at being a respectable husband (“I suck at love, I think I need a do-over”), and most notably, his unfaithfulness. As Jay and Beyonce grew apart and desolate from the stillborns, he went to find affection through cheating (I read this in a Genius annotation and haven't been able to verify the timeline so take with a grain of salt). This ripped them further apart, and in verse 3 he describes how a threesome resulted in him almost losing his family (also worth noting it lead to Beyonce’s album Lemonade). He goes a step further in his regret to consider how his children will react to these things (seeing the falsehoods in his father as a hero), once they inevitably do through others via the internet or write-ups (hopefully not this one!). As the song climaxes to this realization, the sample hits harder than ever with the words “I’m never gonna treat you like I should”. The roaring beat and verses make for a truly moving dynamic. Raw emotion is dripping in every aspect here. No I.D. brought out the most regretful and personal side of Shawn Carter. The soulful production, emotional vocals, and brutally honest lyrics makes this song not only one of Jay's best, but most wise. The moment it begins, it demands your attention. You don't have to worry about any fools skimming through this one, Jay.
“Family Feud” begins with Beyonce, which is perfect for the next song on the album. No ID sampled her vocals throughout the beat and her singing with Jay shows us there is always hope (especially after the previous song). Showing hope for relationships is a vital theme to the song, which we’ll see soon. Jay is back to a more confident approach in offering his wisdom. He spends his first verse talking about being successful, exploring religion, and sends a subliminal shot at Drake (“All this old talk left me confused / You'd rather be old rich me or new you?”). He also criticizes certain fans of old school hip hop for their judgements of new school hip hop fashion. Throughout the song wealth is discussed, but now strictly in braggadocio. He want’s to support fellow black peoples in their endeavours, in order to help revolt against black people being less-advantaged as a result of skin colour. This can be shown with:
I'll be damned if I drink some Belvedere while Puff got CÎROC
And throughout the song he says:
Nobody wins when the family feuds
In this case, family is referring to fellow black people. He advises unity and support will help communities, and bring more equality to society. In his Rap Radar interview, he mentions how as you go up in the world of success, there are less and less blacks. He uses his wealth as a goal for others to reach and encourages they do so through helping one and other. The song is both critical of older and newer generations with lines like:
Al Sharpton in the mirror takin' selfies
How is him or Pill Cosby s'posed to help me?
Old n***** never accepted me
And
New n***** is the reason I stopped drinkin' Dos Equis
This attempts to display the different mentalities. He continually mentions that 2 billions is better than 1, representing new and old generations (and his marriage as well). The message is this: put aside your differences and work as a team, because nobody wins when the family feuds.
For the past 24 minutes and 1 seconds, we have seen “Kill Jay Z” in place, essentially abandoning the persona that lead to his success. But there is a change of pace during the duration of “Bam” that makes it so exciting. The first words from Jay (and a reference to “Public Service Announcement”, from TBA) tell you exactly what I mean:
Fuck all this pretty Shawn Carter shit nigga, HOV
The aggressive nature of the line and Damian Marley’s chorus set the song up for Jay to come through to set records straight, and that he does. Dehaven was a drug dealer Jay worked with back in his hustling pre-music days. On social media, Dehaven has routinely claimed Jay never really did much hustling and was a mere runner. Hov spends part of his first verse shooting this down, claiming if he was only a runner he wouldn’t had’ve became the success he is now (as his music and clothing ventures cost a lot to begin). He goes onto explains that his nice side, Shawn, used to be in ‘flight mode’, as he was completely in the Jay Z mindset. This was the side of him that got him to be so wealthy (and continues to push him). Verse 2 is only 12 bars long, but is coated with references and entendres. He uses Rae Sremmurd, Bobby Shmurda, Nat Turner, Kanye, Black Sheep, and even the fact that he skips leg day, all to brag to us in the most clever ways. The mention of Rae and Bobby also could tie back to “Family Feud”, as it’s touching on the theme of newschool rappers. The hard hitting street reggae provide Jay with the perfect backdrop for him to use his ego for good and let people know he’s not fabricated.
The title of “Moonlight” is a reference to the film by the same name. It famously was confused with La La Land at the most recent Academy Awards, which Jay references in the hook of “Moonlight”. What makes the film Moonlight noteworthy is that it is the first film to win a Grammy for Best Picture that features an all black class, as well as the first LGBT movie to do the same. Moonlight is special because it excels without being like every other popular movie. The song “Moonlight” is asking rappers to apply this same principle to their artistry, as many popular rap acts aren’t experimenting or pushing the boundaries creativity-wise. Jay isn’t impressed:
Y'all got the same fuckin' flows
I don't know who is who
Jay pokes fun at the skrrt adlib (used by popular trap acts), how artists use the internet to snitch on themselves (for image), and how many of them not only make the same music, but share the same image. It particularly annoys Jay at the ego many of these artists share:
Stop walkin' around like y'all made Thriller, huh?
Jay also references how many rappers are signing to their first label offers, and specifically mentions how Lauryn Hill struggled with labels. This is a fitting choice of reference as the song samples Fu-Gee-La. Which gives the chorus’s use of La La Land 3 meanings:reference to film, reference to sample, and reference to artists being ignorant about their quality of music. Jay’s career proves you can make yourself successful without a label’s early on help, whilst innovating and making non formulaic music. This song alone pushes boundaries, in topics for sure, but instrumentally the beat is constantly changing and adjusting (which can be said for 4:44’s production as a whole, in fact). Even his flow is unique, in how he sways his words without ever sticking to one rhythm. He also lived the criminal life many artists use for their image. This gives his words on these topics more respect than otherwise. The song ends criticizing labels for their treatment of artists, mentioning specific CEO’s, in hopes this will sway young artists. Chance, Nas, Lupe, and tons more in the rap industry alone have contributed to this argument all the same. Time will tell if their message and “Moonlight”’s will have an influence or not. Hopefully a healthy change will be made.
Marcy Me is a song made to reflect on his past by tracing out homages to his influences and heroes. Before I break down his lyrics, I gotta say Jay’s flow is as good as it ever has been and the piano/drums/vocal-sample/etc work so well with it. This sample is so obscure on some Madlib type style too (“Todo o mundo e ninguém” By Quarteto 1111, from 1970, if anyone’s curious). Onto the rest of the song! The title alone pays respect to the legendary Marvin Gaye and his track Mercy Me. Then the intro is a Biggie quotation that ends before bragging about sex, which is appropriate for the album and it’s apologetic tones. From there, we see mentions of Jam Master Jay (of Run-DMC, RIP), Dennis Rodman, Michael Jordan, Tichina Arnold (an actress on Martin), Denzel Washington, Slick Rick, and Lisa Bonet. And that’s just within the 1st verse. What’s significant about the nostalgia-riddled details is that each of them helped give a young Shawn hope in Marcy, Brooklyn. He describes marcy with:
I'm from Marcy Houses, where the boys die by the thousand These role models let him keep his head up despite his environment, and because he had hope, he was able to be ambitious, ultimately leading to the development of the Jay Z character that this album has previously explored. We learned earlier that he created Hov as a means to succeed, and we now learn that Hov was able to exist in the first place largely due to the success of other black people. Inspiration was a key factor to his success. Verse 2 has Jay reflecting on his rags to riches story, touching on topics such as cocaine, murderers, areas of Marcy, and rappers that have passed (“rappers turned murals”) or influenced him. Jay sounds confident and relaxed simultaneously. Verse 2 is the definition of ‘cool, calm, and collected’. To end the song, The-Dream (who is way too underrated, just saying) sings a slower outro about remaining true to oneself. It’s a beautiful way to end such a well-constructed strong.
“Legacy” begins with a voice recording of his daughter asking what a will is. Jay uses this to explore how his wealth will benefit his kids and so on, and to explore how family history has impacted his life as well. The word ‘legacy’ refers to the wealth left in a will, as well as the aftermath of a predecessor (which can be from a will but not necessarily). The song explores both sides of the coin. The opening verse is more directed as an answer to his daughter’s initial question, talking about how TIDAL, Roc Nation, Ace of Spades, D’USSE, and such business ventures will go onto support his kids and relatives extensively. This side of the song already feels like a personal discussion just between Jay and his kids about what will follow after he dies. He ends verse 1 on his goal of creating generational wealth and even talks about how blacks are discriminated against in the tech industry. Verse 2 goes into even more personal territory about how Jay’s grandfather molested his aunt (of his father’s side). He claims he may one day forgive him for these actions, but that this negative situation had a silver lining for Jay. His grandfather was a pastor, and due to this, Jay wrote off Christianity (by assuming his grand father’s actions were reflective of the religion he promoted). As a result, he explored other religions. This allowed him a diverse understanding of various sets of beliefs, influencing him to be the critical thinking and understanding person he is today. “Legacy” shows how our actions can influence many generations, and through the most personal ways possible. For such heavy messages, Jay brings hope. Hope is communicated so well through the background horns and James Fauntleroy background singing too. It’s a brilliant closer to the album (if you exclude the bonus tracks). Fun fun fact about Legacy: This song samples Donny Hathaway’s 1971 song “Someday We’ll All Be Free, which was recorded by Jimmy Douglas. Fast forward decades and Douglas mixed all of 4:44.
In order to see the reviews of the bonus tracks you must sign up with TIDAL
Just kidding! Who needs exclusivity?
“Adnis” is named after Adnis Reeves, Jay’s father (who passed away in ‘03). Adnis abandoned Jay when he was just a child (around 11 or 12). Reeves had spent less and less time at home, in hopes of finding his brother’s killer. Eventually he picked up drug addictions and left home entirely, never contacting Jay. They did meet up eventually, in 2002, and from that meeting he forgave Adnis for abandoning him. This allowed him to drop anger that he held onto for so many years and in place he was able to overcome love/trust issues. “Adnis” is ‘an open letter to [Jay’s] dad that [he] never wrote’. In a very slow flow over a very relaxed beat, Carter discusses how Reeves caused him lots of anger growing up. He mentions how he wrote about wanting to fight him, as a means of expressing that anger. He also recognized himself in stories of his father, and gave thought to how his grandfather’s malicious (previously discussed in “Legacy”) actions may have impacted Adnis. He mentions how before Adnis’ brother died, he was a good person and that he taught Jay valuable lessons. Including loving his step siblings no different than non-step siblings. It’s clear from the first verse that Adnis was a good father and a role model to Jay during some of his earliest formative years. Verse 2 mentions how despite being the youngest in his family, and despite his father’s leave, he eventually became the leader of his family. He mentions how his father reacted poorly to his uncle’s death, because according to their beliefs, his uncle was in a better place. Life was out of Adnis’ hands, instead there were bottles and needles. Despite his father becoming a terrible role model, Jay takes pride in him being a caring parent and husband. It’s a sweet note to end on after the previous more harder to swallow sorrows. Jay doesn’t shy away from talking about emotional subjects, I have no doubt this song was hard to make for him. And then to release such an open and personal song, exposing your thoughts and feelings to the public, couldn’t have been so easy. But I’m grateful he did, because “Adnis” is one of the best this year.
Blue’s Freestyle / We Family opens up with Jay’s daughter Blue spitting some straight bars about how she’s never seen a ceiling, seeking those who are innocent, and most interestingly about how everything is shakalaka. I can’t disagree with her there! It’s a cute little opener to a more light hearted sounding song. The beat has some hawaiian influence and Jay never goes to in depth, as each verse is only about 6 lines long (although there are 4 of them). In the short amount of time he does however cover a lot of ground, referencing illuminati claims, his thankfulness for his wife, celebration of heritage, black unity, drug dealing, his worldwide fans, Donald Trump (and his concerns about him), and his excessive travelling. Quite possibly the most amount of topics covered in one song when compared to any other one on the album. And in between each verse is a small hook claiming he’s part of a family. All of these topics, although seemingly unrelated, connect back to the construct of family. His illuminati controversy is because he has heritage (from family members) that roots back to the use of voodoo, he claims tauntingly. His wife is part of his family, and her heritage has played a role in shaping their kids and thus his family. Worldwide fans and black unity are alike in that they are united for a common goal that Jay is involved in, making them family. Drug dealing played a role in his success and as a result him meeting Beyonce, etc. Donald Trump concerns Jay because he cares for his fellow Americans, they’re a form of family as well. What makes this song great is the spider web Jay creates, connecting so many topics so quickly into a light sounding coherent song. And the intro is really all to perfect as an opener for it. Now we just gotta wait on Blue’s mixtape.
MaNyafaCedGod (which I’m sure Jay titled like a cap sensitive password in order to aggravate bloggers, anyone else think of that Spongebob meme?) is possibly the most underrated track on the album. It’s got a great beat change, soothing James Blake singing, and really dense honest lyrics. The first beat is real smooth with James on the keys. The first verse talks about Beyonce and Jay Z’s tour together and how it served as a means of healing for them. Among forms of coping, such as drinking, smoking, vacay, and sex. He touches on themes mentioned earlier in the album, such as the ‘what if’ thoughts of losing his kids and wife over stupid decisions he made. During the tour together Jay mentions how after he performed “Song Cry”, she’d perform “Resentment” and that this order of songs was a very real reflection of the emotions they were experiencing. Fauntleroy ends the 1st half of the song with a very poetic piece about changing out of the fear of loneliness, most likely to reflect Jay’s mindset during the aftermath of his cheating. Then the 2nd half begins with a more menacing anxious beat and Jay gives us the final verse on the album (if you’re counting bonus tracks, that is). He begins by mentioning how him and Bey would have to put on an act to look happy for media even though they were not, but that this served as an opportunity to force themselves to look for the good in life. From here, Jay continues in a more prideful and strong commentary in regards to his marriage. He says that they get each other, and will always have one and other through all. He compares their relationship to kintsukuroi, a Japanese method of fixing broken pottery by using gold as a bind, resulting in a more beautiful piece. In a similar sense, his marriage is better than ever despite the obstacles it faced. He believes that all these challenges have happened because of forces that are beyond his control, and that people must do their best to handle every situation. He gives us the advice his mother gave him, and that is to never go to bed mad at a loved one. Rather talk out the issues and get peace of mind, sound advice from a guy who’s been through so much.
And that is the final song on the project. To conclude, 4:44 is a brilliant album that dives deep into Jay’s most heart-wrenching thoughts and with them comes mature responses. No ID (with some help from James Fauntleroy and occasional sample recommendations from Hov) brings this out in Jay with soul sampling beats that come off nostalgic yet unique, like an updated version of The Blueprint. The verses,the beats, the vocals, the mixing, everything, is done in a way that translates into a feeling of being personal. It’s personal, it’s mature, it’s revealing, it’s emotional, it’s soothing, it’s therapeutic. It extensively covers so much ground in so little time. 4:44 is not only my favourite album of 2017, but one of Jay’s best albums yet.
Favorite Lyrics
I'm surprised you ain't auction off the casket
Caught In Their Eyes
Y'all on the 'Gram holdin' money to your ear
There's a disconnect, we don't call that money over here
The Story of OJ
Mama had four kids, but she's a lesbian
Had to pretend so long that she's a thespian
Had to hide in the closet, so she medicate
Society shame and the pain was too much to take
Cried tears of joy when you fell in love
Don't matter to me if it's a him or her
Smile
I seen the innocence leave your eyes
I still mourn this death and
I apologize for all the stillborns cause I wasn't present
Your body wouldn't accept it
4:44
Talking Points
Do you think Jay made the right call ending the album at Legacy?
Do you think Jay made the right decision not to have any radio singles for the album?
Where does this album compare among the rest of his discography?
Where does he go from here?
How do you feel about the mixing on some of Jay’s vocals?
Do you agree with Jay’s social commentary on songs like Family Feud and Story of OJ?
Thoughts on Jay's flows? Marcy Me is very different from some other songs because the other ones doesn't showcase flow as much
And favourite lyrics/songs/moments etc
(Edit - James Blake not Fauntleroy correction made)
submitted by Burntholesinmyhoodie to hiphop101 [link] [comments]


2017.12.10 17:22 Burntholesinmyhoodie Album of the Year #10: JAY Z - 4:44

Artist: JAY Z
Album: 4:44
Listen:
Apple Music
TIDAL
Background
Throughout all of Jay Z’s past albums, we've come to understand and love this character known for his drug dealing, no-strings-attached sex, and excessive wealth (Jay built his Roc-A-Fella dynasty, became CEO of Def Jam Recordings, and achieved so much more due to his ability to hustle). This character being Jay Z, Hov, Jigga, but not Shawn Carter. Although there have certainly been instances of him being personal in the past (selling drugs to his mother, shooting his brother, feeling responsible for his nephews death, and so on), the large majority of his music has been braggadocio. Magna Carta Holy Grail, his previous album (from 2013), spent almost an hour telling us about his love for riches. Whether that be his collection of Basquiat paintings, designer clothes, or liquor preferences, by the end… well we got the point. Although it did touch on serious topics here and there, it was far from what a 40 year old father would sound fitting discussing. The party-friendly, trap-influenced, attempt at mainstream pandering was about as interesting as watching paint dry. And not even a Basquiat at that.
Now fast forward to 2017. In the time span between 2013 and now, Solange (his sister-in-law), was caught hitting him in an elevator. Then his once close friend, Kanye West, ranted against him. And finally, his wife, Beyonce, made an entire album about him supposedly cheating on her. With controversy at a high surrounding Jay’s respectability, everyone was hungry to hear what he had to say. Curiosity began peaking when billboards and sign began appearing with nothing more that the the numbers “4:44”. It wasn’t much longer until more went up with a date (6.30.17) and a name, JAY Z. No one knew what to expect from a 2017 Jay album, but it’s safe to say he surpassed any and all that prefaced him.
Review
10 seconds into the appropriately titled first track, “Kill Jay Z”, we’re faced with these lines:
Kill Jay Z, they'll never love you
You'll never be enough, let's just keep it real, Jay Z
Fuck Jay Z, I mean, you shot your own brother
First thing off the bat, Jay is dismembering his persona and taking a more self-aware approach. Eric Carter did survive the bullet, and Jay was only a child when this instance took place, but we can see his past mistakes still haunts him to this day. It appears as though he’s still learning how to live with his regrets. What makes “Kill Jay Z” so transparent is that in the process of examining his mistakes and how needs to change, he attacks the ego that has helped him to achieve so much. It’s only fitting he opens up so much on the opening track. Soon after these lines he goes onto discuss how he must change for his children, his tears, pain, regret, and how the mentality he once needed for hustling is no longer necessary. He touches on his relationship with longtime friend and collaborator, Kanye West, and ultimately we can see they’re not in a good place. He ends the song on a few lines referencing how he ‘almost went Eric Benét’, Eric had continually cheated on Halle Berry, giving us a quick glimpse at a very prevalent regret Jay currently has that we will learn most about on the album's title track. Jay’s reflective lyrics flow incredibly well over the soulful (yet modern) No ID production. No ID handles all the production on the album, and each beat is fantastic and perfect for Jay’s crafting. His drums, sample flips, everything, No ID is a legend and absolutely kills it.
A smooth mix of piano and vocal sample (of the legendary Nina Simone) begin “The Story of O.J.”, before Jay comes in discussing the labels that have been attributed to black people in various places of society. The simply worded hook has so much to offer. It shows that people want to separate themselves from molds, but that despite this, due to experiences related to skin colour, there continues to be a common thread and underlying sense of unity. Jay takes 2 perspectives in order to urge people not to abandon recognition of their race, as being aware will help to bring change moreso. This negative viewpoint of his can be seen in this line (most importantly his reaction, listen to how he says it):
O.J. like, "I'm not black, I'm O.J." …okay
The first verse has Jay speaking to what could represent his younger south and many black youth today. He encourages drug dealers to stop before it’s too late and invest their earnings in wise and legitimate ways. The 2nd (and final) verse continues to further discuss how Jay has spent money wisely and also where he wishes he had. Ultimately, Jay wants to help those less-advantaged black youth to become successful like he has, and to live a full life. The goal is to paint himself as a healthy role model but also one that can admit his mistakes, to promote the best choices he can. And for such a race related song, the Simone sample is perfect. “The Story of O.J.” is a great song to show Jay’s growth in maturity, and the beat is especially fitting to this growth.
Jay’s first lines on “Smile” are continuing from where “The Story of O.J.” left off, further discussing his rags to riches and wealth. But it’s right after these first few lines Jay discusses a more personal insight towards his life, with these lines:
Mama had four kids, but she's a lesbian
Had to pretend so long that she's a thespian
Had to hide in the closet, so she medicate
Society shame and the pain was too much to take
Cried tears of joy when you fell in love
Jay is going beyond talking about the challenges gays face and allowing us to see how they have impacted his mother. Society would’ve condemned her for being attracted to the same sex. So, she tried for many years to change and act as if she were straight. This moment serves as another great example of Jay’s personal growth, as he used to use homophobic insults in songs such as “Takeover” and “N- What, N- Who (Originator 99)”. Jay goes on to discuss being loyal, his wealth, overcoming obstacles, Funkmaster Flex, and uses his pen-free abilities to craft great wordplay that Hov is known for. He’s showing happiness for his success, for his mom, and for life, which is only right for a song titled “Smile”. ID did a great job with the catchy Stevie Wonder flip and the song ends with a beautiful poem from Gloria, Jay’s mother. She spreads a positive message that encourages people to be happy with who they are, which is very appropriate based on all she had gone through. I believe it’s the 2nd time she has appeared on a Jay album (first being on The Black Album), and is a great way to close a great song.
“Caught In Their Eyes” has a more happy beat backing Jay. He uses his first verse to describe his struggles growing up and paints a portrait of those who oppose him. All while using some great wordplay. For instance:
I seen eyes wide as they're about to shoot
You can be a hairpin off and you can trigger your roots
On the surface level he’s describing the ways people lived and how they acted, and beyond that is another entendre about Questlove and the legendary Roots. Another line I really like is:
Y'all body language is all remedial
How could you see the difference between you and I?
The first meaning being the literal, that you can’t fathom how many leagues Hov is above you. But also it sounds like the literal letters ‘U’ and ‘I’. Then on top of that, the previous line ended on ‘remedial’, so you expect him to end the following line in the same scheme. This is no mistake, as ‘me and you’ could work easily in ‘you and I’’s place. His change of lyrics makes the words stand out more and is proper English, which could be a play on ‘language’ in ‘body language’. The whole first verse also has a theme of the human body throughout it, body language, hair, his cheek, and at least 3 references to eyes. It’s a short but very interesting and dense verse. Following it, Frank Ocean lends a small and curious hook, touching on the topic of Solipsism and determining what’s real. He claims he’s ready for Earth. Now I’m not certain of what the exact meaning of the hook is and I don’t want to take too big of stretches, but it’s possible it’s too show that the speaker of the song is more real (in a sense of loyalty and principles) than everyone. So much so that he feels as though everything else is literally fiction. Jay uses the 2nd verse to discuss how Londell McMillan (whom he names specifically) screwed over both Jay and Prince’s wished in regards to Prince’s music on streaming services. Despite Prince giving TIDAL (and only TIDAL) permission to use his music, McMillan sued Jay after Prince died in order to gain full control of Prince’s music. He describes the greed that exists in the record industry and ends the verse continuing on the theme of those who oppose him, referencing his ending friendship with Kanye. All of this sounds great over the groovy Nina Simone-sampled beat. I also really like the voice effects on Frank and Jay, it gives a really interesting texture to the song that makes the incredibly smooth beginning of the next track contrast beautifully.
“4:44”, the title track to the album, is in my opinion the most important song to the album. Honestly, I hesitated doing a review on this album because doing this song justice is no easy task. It’s grown to be one of my favourite Jay tracks and my song of the year. But nonetheless I will try!
Do I find it so hard
When I know in my heart
I'm letting you down every day
Letting you down every day
Why do I keep on running away?
No ID opens the song with an incredibly introspective piece of foreshadowing. From this 24 second intro, a red carpet is rolled out for Jay to give us opening lines that speak to us. And he does so with:
Look, I apologize, often womanize
Took for my child to be born, see through a woman's eyes
After years of tracks like Big Pimpin, Girls Girls Girls, Ain’t No N-, On To The Next One, 2 Many Hoes… well you get the idea, he opens up this track with lines that directly oppose and regret such a mindset (and lifestyle). 2017 is the year we saw Jay Z the feminist (at least on this song), and I for one love the growth. Jay not only regrets womanizing, but regrets how he treated his wife Beyonce (asking her not to embarrass him, for instance). He mentions begs Beyonce to pick up the phone and the vocal effect on his voice almost reminds me of a phone call, not sure if that was an intentional connection or not (but it certainly enhances my enjoyment regardless). He goes on to describe Beyonce maturing faster than him, dealing with multiple stillborns (when Jay performed this song live on SNL he actually didn’t say ‘stillborn’ because of the pain), treating her poorly in public, his terrible attempts at being a respectable husband (“I suck at love, I think I need a do-over”), and most notably, his unfaithfulness. As Jay and Beyonce grew apart and desolate from the stillborns, he went to find affection through cheating (I read this in a Genius annotation and haven't been able to verify the timeline so take with a grain of salt). This ripped them further apart, and in verse 3 he describes how a threesome resulted in him almost losing his family (also worth noting it lead to Beyonce’s album Lemonade). He goes a step further in his regret to consider how his children will react to these things (seeing the falsehoods in his father as a hero), once they inevitably do through others via the internet or write-ups (hopefully not this one!). As the song climaxes to this realization, the sample hits harder than ever with the words “I’m never gonna treat you like I should”. The roaring beat and verses make for a truly moving dynamic. Raw emotion is dripping in every aspect here. No I.D. brought out the most regretful and personal side of Shawn Carter. The soulful production, emotional vocals, and brutally honest lyrics makes this song not only one of Jay's best, but most wise. The moment it begins, it demands your attention. You don't have to worry about any fools skimming through this one, Jay.
“Family Feud” begins with Beyonce, which is perfect for the next song on the album. No ID sampled her vocals throughout the beat and her singing with Jay shows us there is always hope (especially after the previous song). Showing hope for relationships is a vital theme to the song, which we’ll see soon. Jay is back to a more confident approach in offering his wisdom. He spends his first verse talking about being successful, exploring religion, and sends a subliminal shot at Drake (“All this old talk left me confused / You'd rather be old rich me or new you?”). He also criticizes certain fans of old school hip hop for their judgements of new school hip hop fashion. Throughout the song wealth is discussed, but now strictly in braggadocio. He want’s to support fellow black peoples in their endeavours, in order to help revolt against black people being less-advantaged as a result of skin colour. This can be shown with:
I'll be damned if I drink some Belvedere while Puff got CÎROC
And throughout the song he says:
Nobody wins when the family feuds
In this case, family is referring to fellow black people. He advises unity and support will help communities, and bring more equality to society. In his Rap Radar interview, he mentions how as you go up in the world of success, there are less and less blacks. He uses his wealth as a goal for others to reach and encourages they do so through helping one and other. The song is both critical of older and newer generations with lines like:
Al Sharpton in the mirror takin' selfies
How is him or Pill Cosby s'posed to help me?
Old n***** never accepted me
And
New n***** is the reason I stopped drinkin' Dos Equis
This attempts to display the different mentalities. He continually mentions that 2 billions is better than 1, representing new and old generations (and his marriage as well). The message is this: put aside your differences and work as a team, because nobody wins when the family feuds.
For the past 24 minutes and 1 seconds, we have seen “Kill Jay Z” in place, essentially abandoning the persona that lead to his success. But there is a change of pace during the duration of “Bam” that makes it so exciting. The first words from Jay (and a reference to “Public Service Announcement”, from TBA) tell you exactly what I mean:
Fuck all this pretty Shawn Carter shit nigga, HOV
The aggressive nature of the line and Damian Marley’s chorus set the song up for Jay to come through to set records straight, and that he does. Dehaven was a drug dealer Jay worked with back in his hustling pre-music days. On social media, Dehaven has routinely claimed Jay never really did much hustling and was a mere runner. Hov spends part of his first verse shooting this down, claiming if he was only a runner he wouldn’t had’ve became the success he is now (as his music and clothing ventures cost a lot to begin). He goes onto explains that his nice side, Shawn, used to be in ‘flight mode’, as he was completely in the Jay Z mindset. This was the side of him that got him to be so wealthy (and continues to push him). Verse 2 is only 12 bars long, but is coated with references and entendres. He uses Rae Sremmurd, Bobby Shmurda, Nat Turner, Kanye, Black Sheep, and even the fact that he skips leg day, all to brag to us in the most clever ways. The mention of Rae and Bobby also could tie back to “Family Feud”, as it’s touching on the theme of newschool rappers. The hard hitting street reggae provide Jay with the perfect backdrop for him to use his ego for good and let people know he’s not fabricated.
The title of “Moonlight” is a reference to the film by the same name. It famously was confused with La La Land at the most recent Academy Awards, which Jay references in the hook of “Moonlight”. What makes the film Moonlight noteworthy is that it is the first film to win a Grammy for Best Picture that features an all black class, as well as the first LGBT movie to do the same. Moonlight is special because it excels without being like every other popular movie. The song “Moonlight” is asking rappers to apply this same principle to their artistry, as many popular rap acts aren’t experimenting or pushing the boundaries creativity-wise. Jay isn’t impressed:
Y'all got the same fuckin' flows
I don't know who is who
Jay pokes fun at the skrrt adlib (used by popular trap acts), how artists use the internet to snitch on themselves (for image), and how many of them not only make the same music, but share the same image. It particularly annoys Jay at the ego many of these artists share:
Stop walkin' around like y'all made Thriller, huh?
Jay also references how many rappers are signing to their first label offers, and specifically mentions how Lauryn Hill struggled with labels. This is a fitting choice of reference as the song samples Fu-Gee-La. Which gives the chorus’s use of La La Land 3 meanings:reference to film, reference to sample, and reference to artists being ignorant about their quality of music. Jay’s career proves you can make yourself successful without a label’s early on help, whilst innovating and making non formulaic music. This song alone pushes boundaries, in topics for sure, but instrumentally the beat is constantly changing and adjusting (which can be said for 4:44’s production as a whole, in fact). Even his flow is unique, in how he sways his words without ever sticking to one rhythm. He also lived the criminal life many artists use for their image. This gives his words on these topics more respect than otherwise. The song ends criticizing labels for their treatment of artists, mentioning specific CEO’s, in hopes this will sway young artists. Chance, Nas, Lupe, and tons more in the rap industry alone have contributed to this argument all the same. Time will tell if their message and “Moonlight”’s will have an influence or not. Hopefully a healthy change will be made.
Marcy Me is a song made to reflect on his past by tracing out homages to his influences and heroes. Before I break down his lyrics, I gotta say Jay’s flow is as good as it ever has been and the piano/drums/vocal-sample/etc work so well with it. This sample is so obscure on some Madlib type style too (“Todo o mundo e ninguém” By Quarteto 1111, from 1970, if anyone’s curious). Onto the rest of the song! The title alone pays respect to the legendary Marvin Gaye and his track Mercy Me. Then the intro is a Biggie quotation that ends before bragging about sex, which is appropriate for the album and it’s apologetic tones. From there, we see mentions of Jam Master Jay (of Run-DMC, RIP), Dennis Rodman, Michael Jordan, Tichina Arnold (an actress on Martin), Denzel Washington, Slick Rick, and Lisa Bonet. And that’s just within the 1st verse. What’s significant about the nostalgia-riddled details is that each of them helped give a young Shawn hope in Marcy, Brooklyn. He describes marcy with:
I'm from Marcy Houses, where the boys die by the thousand These role models let him keep his head up despite his environment, and because he had hope, he was able to be ambitious, ultimately leading to the development of the Jay Z character that this album has previously explored. We learned earlier that he created Hov as a means to succeed, and we now learn that Hov was able to exist in the first place largely due to the success of other black people. Inspiration was a key factor to his success. Verse 2 has Jay reflecting on his rags to riches story, touching on topics such as cocaine, murderers, areas of Marcy, and rappers that have passed (“rappers turned murals”) or influenced him. Jay sounds confident and relaxed simultaneously. Verse 2 is the definition of ‘cool, calm, and collected’. To end the song, The-Dream (who is way too underrated, just saying) sings a slower outro about remaining true to oneself. It’s a beautiful way to end such a well-constructed strong.
“Legacy” begins with a voice recording of his daughter asking what a will is. Jay uses this to explore how his wealth will benefit his kids and so on, and to explore how family history has impacted his life as well. The word ‘legacy’ refers to the wealth left in a will, as well as the aftermath of a predecessor (which can be from a will but not necessarily). The song explores both sides of the coin. The opening verse is more directed as an answer to his daughter’s initial question, talking about how TIDAL, Roc Nation, Ace of Spades, D’USSE, and such business ventures will go onto support his kids and relatives extensively. This side of the song already feels like a personal discussion just between Jay and his kids about what will follow after he dies. He ends verse 1 on his goal of creating generational wealth and even talks about how blacks are discriminated against in the tech industry. Verse 2 goes into even more personal territory about how Jay’s grandfather molested his aunt (of his father’s side). He claims he may one day forgive him for these actions, but that this negative situation had a silver lining for Jay. His grandfather was a pastor, and due to this, Jay wrote off Christianity (by assuming his grand father’s actions were reflective of the religion he promoted). As a result, he explored other religions. This allowed him a diverse understanding of various sets of beliefs, influencing him to be the critical thinking and understanding person he is today. “Legacy” shows how our actions can influence many generations, and through the most personal ways possible. For such heavy messages, Jay brings hope. Hope is communicated so well through the background horns and James Fauntleroy background singing too. It’s a brilliant closer to the album (if you exclude the bonus tracks). Fun fun fact about Legacy: This song samples Donny Hathaway’s 1971 song “Someday We’ll All Be Free, which was recorded by Jimmy Douglas. Fast forward decades and Douglas mixed all of 4:44.
In order to see the reviews of the bonus tracks you must sign up with TIDAL
Just kidding! Who needs exclusivity?
“Adnis” is named after Adnis Reeves, Jay’s father (who passed away in ‘03). Adnis abandoned Jay when he was just a child (around 11 or 12). Reeves had spent less and less time at home, in hopes of finding his brother’s killer. Eventually he picked up drug addictions and left home entirely, never contacting Jay. They did meet up eventually, in 2002, and from that meeting he forgave Adnis for abandoning him. This allowed him to drop anger that he held onto for so many years and in place he was able to overcome love/trust issues. “Adnis” is ‘an open letter to [Jay’s] dad that [he] never wrote’. In a very slow flow over a very relaxed beat, Carter discusses how Reeves caused him lots of anger growing up. He mentions how he wrote about wanting to fight him, as a means of expressing that anger. He also recognized himself in stories of his father, and gave thought to how his grandfather’s malicious (previously discussed in “Legacy”) actions may have impacted Adnis. He mentions how before Adnis’ brother died, he was a good person and that he taught Jay valuable lessons. Including loving his step siblings no different than non-step siblings. It’s clear from the first verse that Adnis was a good father and a role model to Jay during some of his earliest formative years. Verse 2 mentions how despite being the youngest in his family, and despite his father’s leave, he eventually became the leader of his family. He mentions how his father reacted poorly to his uncle’s death, because according to their beliefs, his uncle was in a better place. Life was out of Adnis’ hands, instead there were bottles and needles. Despite his father becoming a terrible role model, Jay takes pride in him being a caring parent and husband. It’s a sweet note to end on after the previous more harder to swallow sorrows. Jay doesn’t shy away from talking about emotional subjects, I have no doubt this song was hard to make for him. And then to release such an open and personal song, exposing your thoughts and feelings to the public, couldn’t have been so easy. But I’m grateful he did, because “Adnis” is one of the best this year.
Blue’s Freestyle / We Family opens up with Jay’s daughter Blue spitting some straight bars about how she’s never seen a ceiling, seeking those who are innocent, and most interestingly about how everything is shakalaka. I can’t disagree with her there! It’s a cute little opener to a more light hearted sounding song. The beat has some hawaiian influence and Jay never goes to in depth, as each verse is only about 6 lines long (although there are 4 of them). In the short amount of time he does however cover a lot of ground, referencing illuminati claims, his thankfulness for his wife, celebration of heritage, black unity, drug dealing, his worldwide fans, Donald Trump (and his concerns about him), and his excessive travelling. Quite possibly the most amount of topics covered in one song when compared to any other one on the album. And in between each verse is a small hook claiming he’s part of a family. All of these topics, although seemingly unrelated, connect back to the construct of family. His illuminati controversy is because he has heritage (from family members) that roots back to the use of voodoo, he claims tauntingly. His wife is part of his family, and her heritage has played a role in shaping their kids and thus his family. Worldwide fans and black unity are alike in that they are united for a common goal that Jay is involved in, making them family. Drug dealing played a role in his success and as a result him meeting Beyonce, etc. Donald Trump concerns Jay because he cares for his fellow Americans, they’re a form of family as well. What makes this song great is the spider web Jay creates, connecting so many topics so quickly into a light sounding coherent song. And the intro is really all to perfect as an opener for it. Now we just gotta wait on Blue’s mixtape.
MaNyafaCedGod (which I’m sure Jay titled like a cap sensitive password in order to aggravate bloggers, anyone else think of that Spongebob meme?) is possibly the most underrated track on the album. It’s got a great beat change, soothing James Blake singing, and really dense honest lyrics. The first beat is real smooth with James on the keys. The first verse talks about Beyonce and Jay Z’s tour together and how it served as a means of healing for them. Among forms of coping, such as drinking, smoking, vacay, and sex. He touches on themes mentioned earlier in the album, such as the ‘what if’ thoughts of losing his kids and wife over stupid decisions he made. During the tour together Jay mentions how after he performed “Song Cry”, she’d perform “Resentment” and that this order of songs was a very real reflection of the emotions they were experiencing. Fauntleroy ends the 1st half of the song with a very poetic piece about changing out of the fear of loneliness, most likely to reflect Jay’s mindset during the aftermath of his cheating. Then the 2nd half begins with a more menacing anxious beat and Jay gives us the final verse on the album (if you’re counting bonus tracks, that is). He begins by mentioning how him and Bey would have to put on an act to look happy for media even though they were not, but that this served as an opportunity to force themselves to look for the good in life. From here, Jay continues in a more prideful and strong commentary in regards to his marriage. He says that they get each other, and will always have one and other through all. He compares their relationship to kintsukuroi, a Japanese method of fixing broken pottery by using gold as a bind, resulting in a more beautiful piece. In a similar sense, his marriage is better than ever despite the obstacles it faced. He believes that all these challenges have happened because of forces that are beyond his control, and that people must do their best to handle every situation. He gives us the advice his mother gave him, and that is to never go to bed mad at a loved one. Rather talk out the issues and get peace of mind, sound advice from a guy who’s been through so much.
And that is the final song on the project. To conclude, 4:44 is a brilliant album that dives deep into Jay’s most heart-wrenching thoughts and with them comes mature responses. No ID (with some help from James Fauntleroy and occasional sample recommendations from Hov) brings this out in Jay with soul sampling beats that come off nostalgic yet unique, like an updated version of The Blueprint. The verses,the beats, the vocals, the mixing, everything, is done in a way that translates into a feeling of being personal. It’s personal, it’s mature, it’s revealing, it’s emotional, it’s soothing, it’s therapeutic. It extensively covers so much ground in so little time. 4:44 is not only my favourite album of 2017, but one of Jay’s best albums yet.
Favorite Lyrics
I'm surprised you ain't auction off the casket
Caught In Their Eyes
Y'all on the 'Gram holdin' money to your ear
There's a disconnect, we don't call that money over here
The Story of OJ
Mama had four kids, but she's a lesbian
Had to pretend so long that she's a thespian
Had to hide in the closet, so she medicate
Society shame and the pain was too much to take
Cried tears of joy when you fell in love
Don't matter to me if it's a him or her
Smile
I seen the innocence leave your eyes
I still mourn this death and
I apologize for all the stillborns cause I wasn't present
Your body wouldn't accept it
4:44
Talking Points
Do you think Jay made the right call ending the album at Legacy?
Do you think Jay made the right decision not to have any radio singles for the album?
Where does this album compare among the rest of his discography?
Where does he go from here?
How do you feel about the mixing on some of Jay’s vocals?
Do you agree with Jay’s social commentary on songs like Family Feud and Story of OJ?
Thoughts on Jay's flows? Marcy Me is very different from some other songs because the other ones doesn't showcase flow as much
And favourite lyrics/songs/moments etc
(Edit - James Blake not Fauntleroy correction made)
submitted by Burntholesinmyhoodie to hiphopheads [link] [comments]


Tichina Arnold & Tisha Campbell Chat About Hosting The ... Uncensored Season 2 Review Tichina Arnold Tichina Arnold & Friends Plan The Perfect Girlfriend ... Tichina Arnold Daughter Alijah Works Her Nerves The Whole ... Tichina Arnold on friendship with Michel'le & relationship ... Tichina Arnold's Lifestyle 2020 ★ New Boyfriend, Family, Net worth & Biography

Tichina Arnold Boyfriend 2020: Dating History & Exes ...

  1. Tichina Arnold & Tisha Campbell Chat About Hosting The ...
  2. Uncensored Season 2 Review Tichina Arnold
  3. Tichina Arnold & Friends Plan The Perfect Girlfriend ...
  4. Tichina Arnold Daughter Alijah Works Her Nerves The Whole ...
  5. Tichina Arnold on friendship with Michel'le & relationship ...
  6. Tichina Arnold's Lifestyle 2020 ★ New Boyfriend, Family, Net worth & Biography

Tisha Campbell and Tichina Arnold Talk Dating, Friendship and The Soul Train Awards - Duration: 28:16. SWAY'S UNIVERSE 165,449 views. 28:16. 'The Neighborhood' follows Dave Johnson (Max Greenfield) as he and his family arrive from Michigan to an LA community quite different from their previous sma... THANKS FOR VIEWING, FOR UPDATES BE SURE TO SUBSCRIBE! LIKE, COMMENT & SHARE! #tichinaarnold #alijah #martinlawrence HIT THE NOTIFICATION BELL. 🔔 Follow Us On... Tichina was born Tichina Rolanda Arnold on June 28, 1969 in Queens, New York, to a middle-class African-American family. Her mother, Diane Arnold, was a sanitation department worker while her ... Tichina Arnold on friendship with Michel'le & her relationships Celebrity moms Tichina Arnold, Erica Campbell, and Monique Jackson plan the perfect girlfriend weekend getaway to this year's Essence Festival. VISIT OUR SIT...